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    Christa

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    Seems that if the need is there, why isn’t the funding? Perhaps it is caused by teachers themselves: If the students aren’t in the classrooms then the school loses money. If the school loses money, then the teachers are negatively affected. Viscious cycle or job security?

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    Carl Wood

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    This is an interesting look at something I’ve rarely given thought to: on-line courses for high school. It’s a shame that this isn’t utilized more, especially in the case of AP courses. It just makes too much sense as an alternative avenue for learning. It’s unfortunate that money seems to be the hurdle holding back distance-learning based high school.

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    Chris

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    I can’t help but wonder if it’s a matter of funding or if this is a matter of funding an idea (secondary online ed) that hasn’t yet caught on or been accepted by the masses yet. I can’t imagine too many parents and educators believing that high school students can get a “quality” education online. I’m not even taking into account the rural students who may not have more appropriate options either. I wonder if this was just an idea that was too far ahead of its time here in Missouri.

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    Shaun Reno

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    The system seems to be a give away to private online education companies with little oversight. No matter your feelings about charter and private schools, they are in the community and must respond to student and parent needs. Where is the ability to shape the direction of this program on even a state level. Also, the lack of personel investment on the state’s part makes it easier to cut this from the budget. Unless there is a investment of a large group of people to use it, then there is no upcry to keep it.

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